Kayley Woollacott – Starting out over fences


In the first of two documentary clips, Betway sponsored Kayley Woollacott gives us the lowdown on the trials and tribulations of her first full season as a National Hunt trainer. We follow the emotional journey of Kayley and those around her (such as owner David Staddon) as star in the making Lalor wins over the hurdles, then heads to Sandown, before sights are set on a Cheltenham Challenge.

Common misconceptions about making a Nap of the Day

Common misconceptions about making a Nap of the Day  Standing among the selection of immensely popular methods of betting on horse racing, Daily NAP predictions are something you’re likely to find on most tipster websites. The option of a Nap of the Day allows bettors to see an experienced betting website’s choice for what they recognise as being the best horse tip from the current day’s racing action, with it possessing enough of a record to be rated as the most likely to win out of all horses running.

 

Newcomers to betting on horse racing might be tempted to make a double, treble, or accumulator, with the option of backing your bets each-way if you’re aiming to be especially careful while you find your feet. A Nap of the Day is something that’s only worth considering if you’re betting with an extensive knowledge of the sport, as it has to be picked with a complete understanding of horse racing. If you now feel ready to make your own, it’s best to know exactly how they work, and getting past the myths surrounding them would boost your chances of securing a winner.

 

Misconceptions you might hear about naps include:

 

You’re looking for value

 

Whether a Nap of the Day has been used to show consistency in winning one every day, or if it’s simply provided occasionally in order to prove that the person making it is capable of winning the bets they’re offering, you’re unlikely to find large odds for this type of bet. The point of them is to win a single horse bet, and more often than not, this won’t be met by odds much over evens, sometimes even going as low as 1/10, with the primary intention always being to find a winner regardless of the price.

 

Each horse must be at distinctly low odds

 

While you’re not looking for value with the horse you pick for your Nap of the Day, it’s just as important that you don’t go for low odds for the sake of it. All horse bets you make need to be based on statistics, form, records, and reasoning, or they’re likely to lose before they’ve even left the stables; your nap needs to be chosen with the same level of detail. Bookmakers don’t always price their markets based on how likely they think they are to win, with it often being down to the number of bets placed on them, meaning that you can’t always rely on the odds.

 

NAPs are certain to win

 

A lot of people who back a Nap of the Day will be left with no choice but to assume that the specific horse is certain to win their next race. The odds can back up why a horse is so likely to win – and with help from statistics and reasoning, it can seem like a definite winner – but no bet is every guaranteed to win, and you need to remember that before staking any of your own money.